Tag Archives: Colin Firth

Mike Sragow’s Academy Awards 2011 predictions

Best adapted screenplay

Will win/should win: Aaron Sorkin, “The Social Network” 

The “West Wing” creator packed 163 pages worth of words into a two-hour movie. Not a single syllable is wasted. The instant-classic opening scene establishes the movie’s verbal style — a boobytrapped kind of banter — as Harvard whiz Zuckerberg repels a fresh-faced BU girl named Erica (Rooney Mara) with a toxic mixture of hubris and insecurity. And Sorkin sustains and deepens that style right up to the final shots of Zuckerberg staring enigmatically at Erica’s Facebook page.Michael Sragow

Best original screenplay

Will win/Should win: David Seidler, “The King’s Speech

Seidler’s eloquent and impassioned script brought to life a monarch surmounting personal obstacles to become every inch a king, and the complicated, moving bond between this proud, sensitive man and his demanding, unconventional speech therapist. But as Seidler told me in December, “This movie is also about something I’m very passionate about, which is the social contract — which is ignored at our peril, but is ignored continually right now. With privilege, with power, with wealth, comes responsibility and duty. [George VI] absolutely understood this and [Edward VIII] either didn’t or chose adamantly to deny it. His job was to be king and he quit his job. It’s like a certain recent governor of Alaska!”–Michael Sragow

Best cinematography

(AFP/Getty Images / February 10, 2011)

Will win: “True Grit” 

It imbued the wide-open spaces of the Choctaw Nation with palpable wintry textures and made the frontier night as bracing as the blaze of noon.–Michael Sragow

Best film editing

(Handout / February 10, 2011)

Will win/Should win:“The Social Network” 

Alternately sinuous and snappy, the cutting brought an elegant punch to scenes that could have been just punchy. It navigated past and present and multiple perspectives with sureness and lucidity while conjuring an improbable momentum from the charges and counter-charges thrown everywhere from dorms to deposition rooms.–Michael Sragow

Best cinematography

(Kevin Winter, Getty Images / January 7, 2011)

Should win: “The Social Network” 

It not only captures the ambience of Ivy League clubs and classrooms and Northern California start-ups. It also expresses the film’s “Rashomon”-like insistence on the unknowability of “the truth” with every evocative placement or turn of the camera. Michael Sragow

Pictured: Editor Kirk Baxter, composer Atticus Ross and cinematographer Jeff Cronenweth

Best supporting actor

(Getty Images / February 8, 2011)

Will win/Should win: Geoffrey Rush 

Yes, Colin Firth is magnificent as stuttering King George VI, but his performance wouldn’t be possible without Rush’s superb and generous acting. Rush anchors the whole film with his rare capacity to express thought as well as emotion; he finds the full comic and dramatic range to his role as an eccentric speech therapist. .–Michael Sragow

Best actor

(Pascal Le Segretain, Getty Images / February 16, 2011)

Will win: Colin Firth 

As the stammering King George VI in “The King’s Speech,” who finds the British crown thrust upon him as fascism sweeps through Europe, Firth never goes for simple pathos or poignancy. He intermingles deep shyness, stubborn pride, and even a touch of in-grown arrogance.–Michael Sragow

Best actor

(Reuters / January 26, 2011)

Should win: Jesse Eisenberg 

As Mark Zuckerberg in “The Social Network,” Jesse Eisenberg is an electric combination of laser-like intellect and offbeat instinct. He conveys the hidden impulses and emotions in a character who can express himself only in code. He also suggests the vision, intellect and originality that make Zuckerberg a formidable force. And as a boy-man who can’t play well with others, Eisenberg plays well with everybody — especially Andrew Garfield, Justin Timberlake and Rooney Mara.–Michael Sragow

Best supporting actress

(Reuters / February 17, 2011)

Will win/Should win: Hailee Steinfeld 

When the Academy placed young Steinfeld in the best supporting actress category, she instantly overshadowed a field of strong competitors. To quote Donna Tartt’s terrific afterword to the 2004 edition of Charles Portis’ original novel, Steinfeld’s character, Mattie Ross, “is the perfect soldier, despite her sex. She is as tireless as a gun dog; and while we laugh at her single-mindedness, we also stand in awe of it.” Steinfeld embodied this heroine right down to the marrow. She extracted every bit of humor, nuance and rhythm from the complicated dialogue. To call Steinfeld a natural is to do her an injustice. Her skill set is uncanny. –Michael Sragow

Best actress

(Jason Merritt, Getty Images / January 31, 2011)

Will win: Natalie Portman 

In “Black Swan,” Portman is valiant — until you realize that her director is always shooting her from the waist up, she convinces you that she’s a superb dancer. But, off her toes, she can’t do much of anything here except act urgently confused, especially around her slimy-genius choreographer (Vincent Cassel) and her bitter, controlling mother (Barbara Hershey).–Michael Sragow

Best actress

(AFP/Getty Images / February 7, 2011)

Should win: Annette Bening 

Annette Bening is funny, tough and veracious as a devoted lesbian mom who’s enduring a marital mid-life crisis. When she sings a Joni Mitchell song a cappella, in character, unplugging wells of tenderness and yearning, for everyone in the theater, like the title of the song, she’s “All I Want.”–Michael Sragow

Best animated feature film

(Handout/Pixar / January 25, 2011)

Will win/Should win: “Toy Story 3” 

“Toy Story 3” is both a robust coming-of-age comedy-drama and a day care center version of a prison-break thriller. It’s full of giddy farce and heart-stopping climaxes: it puts passion and invention into rounding off a beloved series. –Michael Sragow

Best direction

(Reuters / January 22, 2009)

Will win/Should win: David Fincher 

Every step he took, every move he made — with the camera and his blocking and his actors — brought us closer to his characters. His visual dexterity imbued the tricky constructions of a hyper-verbal script with visceral force. Most important, he did what every great director must do: convince the audience that life was spilling out from the corners of the frame.–Michael Sragow

Best picture

(Reuters / January 25, 2011)

Will win/Should win: “The Social Network” 

Is Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg a heartless villain or a hero in disguise? Are the Winklevoss Twins lovable throwbacks to a gentlemanly era or semi-loathsome embodiments of Old School entitlement? You could read a half-dozen different answers to these questions on the opinion pages of the New York Times alone! With unbridled wit and vitality, “The Social Network” brought universal themes — the demands of friendship and decency, the privileges of genius — into a swift, volatile flow of action. It created a complex contemporary environment pressured by the need for speedy accomplishment and riddled with disconnected personalities. No movie this year had more to say about the way we were five (or 50) years ago and the way we live right now.–Michael Sragow

Source: http://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/movies/zap-2011-oscar-nominees-winners-pics,0,3085155.photogallery

Hollywood shines up for the Oscars

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LOS ANGELES: Hollywood polished up its golden boy statue, the Oscar, for its glittery awards ceremony on Sunday with“The King’s Speech” and “The Network” leading the field for the world’s top movie honors.

The presentation will feature two youthful co-hosts, actorsJames Franco, 32, and Anne Hathaway, 28, marking the first time a man and woman have presided over the Oscars. Hathaway is the youngest person to emcee what is annually the second most-watched TV show in the United States and broadcast live in more than 200 countries worldwide.


“The King’s Speech” andFacebook film “The Social Network” are widely considered front-runners to be named best movie by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Best actress and actor nominees includingNicole KidmanNatalie PortmanJavier Bardem and Colin Firth will parade up the red carpet outside Hollywood’s Kodak Theater in fashionable gowns and tuxedos ahead of the ceremony on Sunday night.

Producers say the ceremony, at which more than 20 awards will be given out in just over three hours, is meant to connect movie fans to the Hollywood of old, while also giving a nod to the future with web cams andTwitter feeds.

The show’s best moments occur when Oscar winners give emotional acceptance speeches.

“(Audiences) want to see when people are moved or touched,” producer Don Mischer said.

THE OSCAR SWEEPSTAKES

For months ahead of Sunday’s big awards, a stream of honors have come from industry groups such as the New York Film Critics Circle,Hollywood Foreign Press Association, Directors Guild of America and Screen Actors Guild.

Where Oscar is concerned, fans saw “Social Network,” which tells of the rise of Facebook from college-oriented website to global phenomenon, scoop up many early critics awards.

But as the season played out, “The King’s Speech,” which tells of a stuttering British king facing his personal demons, was embraced by numerous movie professional groups.

Now, the two will face-off for the Oscars with “King’s Speech” tipped as the favorite.

Colin Firth, in the starring role of King George VI in “King’s Speech,” is widely expected to win best actor because he has claimed most honors from both critics and industry groups. Similarly,Christian Bale and Melissa Leo, both in boxing drama “The Fighter,” are front-runners in supporting categories.

The race for best actress is close between“Black Swan” ballerina Natalie Portman and A-lister Annette Bening playing a lesbian mother with family issues in “The Kids Are All Right.” The category of best director is tight between “Facebook” veteran David Fincherand “King’s Speech” newcomer Tom Hooper.

Will there be a surprise? Oscar watchers think not.

“It looks as if the front-runners will cross the finish line,” said Tom O’Neil, veteran Oscar watcher at awards websites goldderby.com and theenvelope.com.

But anything could happen. As they say in Hollywood, the red carpet is rolled out, the champagne is on ice and the limousines are waiting. It’s Oscar time.

Oscar Picks and Predictions: A Year of Few Surprises

It’s official — I’m clairvoyant.

Early this morning, on NBC affiliate KWQC-TV, yours truly successfully identified all 10 Best Picture nominees.

Before I get too puffed up with pride, I have to acknowledge that it was not too difficult to come up with this list, which is sort of a sad statement. Truth be told, I’d have liked to be wrong on one or two of these picks. I’d have been intrigued to see a “wild card” selection.

Perhaps this presages a year of few surprises at the Oscars, after a year of mostly lackluster movies.

I was never a fan of broadening the field of Best Picture nominees to 10 titles: at a time when many will acknowledge that fewer outstanding movies are seeing the light of day, it seems downright counterintuitive.

Although Oscar history offers plenty of examples of inferior movies getting the top prize, this field of 10 really illustrates how movies that would once have been judged solid or even just serviceable, are now, in a sort of perverse creative inflation, praised to the skies.

To my mind, the Best Picture nominees that meet the historical standard (discounting those glaring instances when Oscar gets it wrong) number five: The King’s Speech, The Social Network, 127 Hours, True Grit, and Winter’s Bone.

The other five may be wildly successful commercially (some even critically), but hardly Best Picture calibre.

Black Swan may be the most overrated of the bunch, in my view — a psycho-sexual thriller which offers only cheap thrills — though admittedly Natalie Portman executes a demanding role effectively.

The Fighter is a solid, highly diverting boxing picture, but let’s face it — no Raging Bull. Toy Story 3 is fun, but it’s a franchise that’s getting milked, with diminishing returns for the viewer.

Inception is a visually impressive but otherwise pretentious and incomprehensible sci-fi entry, while The Kids Are All Right is a smart, hip comedy — admittedly a rarity these days — but hardly in the realm of the few comedies that have taken Best Picture in the past (think 1934’s It Happened One Night or 1977’s Annie Hall.)

Some thoughts on the acting nominations:

Colin Firth should win Best Actor, and I think he will. As runner-up and potential dark horse, I would favor James Franco (his fearless turn in 127 Hours will make him a BIG star, I predict), over Jesse Eisenberg. Jeff Bridges certainly deserves the nod, but I doubt he’ll get it a second time.

For Best Actress, I vote for Annette Bening, whose heartfelt, pitch-perfect performance elevates Kids to a movie worth seeing. She will get heavy competition from Portman, who’s obviously blazingly talented. (I myself have yet to come down with the Portman bug, though I hear it’s catching.)

For Supporting Actor, I dearly hope Geoffrey Rush gets it — he underplays so beautifully next to Firth’s more showy portrayal of King George VI. Still, I think Christian Bale will likely take it for The Fighter, a role in which I thought he was miscast ( you see folks — as good as he was, I could feel him acting).

For Supporting Actress, I’m rooting hard for Melissa Leo — she did for The Fighter just what Bening did for Kids.

For Best Screenplay, I think either The King’s Speech or The Social Network will prevail, and you can bet Inception will clean up on awards relating to visual effects and sound.

And what about Best Picture? Personally, I hope it’s The King’s Speech, but I believe The Social Network will take it. It powerfully captures the Zeitgeist of our times, while Speech will inevitably strike some voters as a first-rate but somewhat dusty period drama. I do hope I’m wrong.

I’ve enjoyed being clairvoyant for this short period. Now that I’ve raised the stakes on myself, I fear I’ll be brought back down to earth very soon — because in the end, no one can totally understand the mysterious ways of Oscar.

But it sure is fun trying.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-farr/oscar-nominations-few-surprises_b_813604.html

Random thoughts on Oscar Nomination

Is Chris Nolan the new Steven Spielberg? Inception received eight nominations, including Best Picture, but Nolan failed to receive a directing nod this morning. That is arguably the biggest surprise in the otherwise predictable batch of Oscar nominations today. Even as someone who doesn’t think it was the greatest genre entry of all-time, it IS a director’s picture through-and-through. Of course, since we now have ten Best Picture nominees and only five Best Director slots, there are arguably five other directors who might be a little annoyed this morning. I’m personally saddened (as much as one can be ‘saddened’ by stuff like this) by the omission of Debra Granik for her direction of Best Picture nominee Winter’s Bone. I know we all like the Coen Brothers, but True Grit is a pretty normal western. If True Grit is Oscar-worthy, then so was 3:10 to Yuma and Open Range. There will be much handwringing over Lisa Cholodenko not getting a Best Director nomination for The Kids Are All Right. But since I kinda hate the film, I’m not too personally annoyed by the omission. At least Mark Ruffalo pulled out a Best Supporting Actor nod out of the deal, since he was the best thing about the film (of course, Ruffalo is usually the best thing about every film he’s in).

 

The actual ten Best Picture nominees were pretty much as predicted a couple months ago (eight of the ten films made either my Best of 2010 or Overrated of 2010 lists). You have two mainstream blockbusters (Inception and Toy Story 3), two mid-summer arthouse favorites (The Kids Are All Right and Winter’s Bone), the one Oscar-bait critical darling that didn’t quite catch fire at the box office (127 Hours), the presumptive front-runner (The Social Network), and the four uber-popular, audience-pleasing bits of late-year Oscar bait (Black Swan, The Fighter, The King’s Speech, and True Grit). It’s a solid cross-section of nominees and proof that the ten-nominee gimmick is a pretty great idea. Not only did the best damn film of the year get in (Toy Story 3), but five of the ten films were released prior to the official Novemeber/December Oscar-bait season. I’m still pulling for a Pixar upset, but right now the four front runners (the films with Picture, Director, Acting, and Editing nods) are The Social Network, Black Swan, The King’s Speech, and The Fighter.

I could spend a column whining about what shouldn’t have been nominated (everything about True Grit save Halee Steinfield), and I won’t mention that I see not a single minority in any of the major nominees lists. But I will only make mention of the fact that Helen Bonham Carter, having spent the last two decades playing all manner of weird and unique characters, gets an Oscar nom for playing the cliched ‘supportive, nurturing, stand-by-your-man wife’, a character with little to do and almost no dialogue. But let’s move on to positive developments. Melissa Leo is now a two-time Oscar nominee and I can’t wait to be able to type the sentence: “Melissa Leo is an Oscar-winning actress”. Christian Bale received his first (!) Oscar nomination for The Fighter, and he’s still the front-runner (only Geoffrey Rush can beat him). Natalie Portman of course was nominated for Best Actress for Black Swan, and at this point she still seems unbeatable (barring a ‘career-award’ upset from Annette Bening).

John Hawkes pulled off a somewhat surprising (and completely pleasing) Best Supporting Actor nomination for Winter’s Bone. Best Actress nominee Jennifer Lawrence justifiably got most of the media buzz, but Hawkes’s supporting turn truly dominates the third act of the terrific little drama. Jackie Weaver snagged a Best Supporting Actress nod for Animal Kingdom, which means the DVD I have from Blockbuster is will probably be watched this evening. Javier Bardem got a somewhat surprising Best Actor nod for Best Foreign film nominee Biutiful and Michelle Williams snuck in for Blue Valentine. Nicole Kidman got a deserved nod for Rabbit Hole, as it’s nice to see people talking about her acting instead of her alleged botox treatments, and/or the shocking fact that films like Rabbit Hole don’t play like Happy Feet or Batman Forever. Whatever my issues about The Social Network (its truthfulness, its alleged cultural impact), Jesse Eisenberg gives a genuinely brilliant performance, so I’m happy he was not lost amidst the press given to director David Fincher and writer Aaron Sorkin.

The Illusionist made the cut in the Best Animated Film Category joining Toy Story 3 and How to Train Your Dragon while beating out more mainstream releases like Despicable Me and Tangled. I sincerely hope that the voting block doesn’t engage in Pixar-backlash and deny Toy Story 3 the Best Animated Film win that it so clearly deserves, but that’s certainly possible. There were few surprises in the various technical categories, although I’m somewhat happily surprised that Tron: Legacy missed out in the Best Visual category. Good on the terrific action picture Unstoppable getting a deserved Best Sound Editing nomination, and yay for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part I getting notice for its often-invisible Visual Effects and its moody Art Direction.

That’s all I have for the moment. I’ll offer my predictions for who or what will win in what categories when time permits, but that’s enough ranting for now. Who do you think got robbed and/or undeservedly nominated? Which nominations made you happiest? Feel free to check in. Oh, and full nomination list is below.

Scott Mendelson

Scource: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/scott-mendelson/oscar-nominations-mostly-good-news_b_813620.html

Oscars 2011 Nominations List: Academy Awards Nominees

 

The British monarchy saga “The King’s Speech” leads the Academy Awards with 12 nominations, including best picture and acting honors for Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter and Geoffrey Rush.

“This story has struck such a rich resonant chord with audiences of all ages, which is very exciting – to have your work honored by your industry peers is even better,” Rush said in a statement.

Also nominated for best picture Tuesday were the psychosexual thriller “Black Swan”; the boxing drama “The Fighter”; the sci-fi blockbuster “Inception”; the lesbian-family tale “The Kids Are All Right“; the survival story “127 Hours”; the Facebook chronicle “The Social Network“; the animated smash “Toy Story 3”; the Western “True Grit”; and the Ozarks crime thriller “Winter’s Bone.”

“True Grit” ran second with 10 nominations, including acting honors for Jeff Bridges and Hailee Steinfeld.

The Feb. 27 Oscars set up a best-picture showdown between two favorites, “The King’s Speech” and “The Social Network.” “The Social Network” won best drama at the Golden Globes and was picked as the year’s best by key critics groups, while “The King’s Speech” pulled an upset last weekend by winning the Producers Guild of America Awards top prize, whose recipient often goes to claim best picture at the Oscars.

The favorites in the male-acting categories both were nominated, Globe winners Firth as best actor for “The King’s Speech” and Christian Bale as supporting actor for “The Fighter.”

The best-actress field shapes up as a two-woman race between Annette Bening for “The Kids Are All Right,” who won the Globe for actress in a musical or comedy, and Natalie Portman for “Black Swan,” who received the Globe for dramatic actress.

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The favorites in the male-acting categories both were nominated, Globe winners Firth as best actor for “The King’s Speech” and Christian Bale as supporting actor for “The Fighter.”

The best-actress field shapes up as a two-woman race between Annette Bening for “The Kids Are All Right,” who won the Globe for actress in a musical or comedy, and Natalie Portman for “Black Swan,” who received the Globe for dramatic actress.

“The Social Network” casts Jesse Eisenberg as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, who’s depicted as an interpersonal lout in one-on-one relations but a genius for the masses, creating an online hangout where half a billion people now keep connected with friends.

“The King’s Speech” stars Firth as Queen Elizabeth II’s father, the stammering George VI, who reluctantly came to the throne after his brother abdicated in 1936, a terrible time for a stuttering monarch as British subjects looked to their ruler for inspiration via radio as World War II approached.

The two films represent a showdown between classy, traditional Oscar bait and edgy, youthful, up-to-the-minute drama.

With its aristocrats, statesmen and perilous times, “The King’s Speech” is a throwback to the majestic, eye-filling costume pageants that dominated film awards in Hollywood’s earlier decades. Its nominations also include best director for Tom Hooper and supporting-acting slots for Bonham Carter as the king’s devoted wife and Rush as his wily speech therapist.

“The Social Network” is an immediate story, set not in palaces but college dorm rooms, cluttered start-up space and anonymous legal offices where Zuckerberg battles former associates over the proceeds of his invention.

David Fincher is the best-directing favorite for “The Social Network” after winning that prize at the Globes.

Along with Firth and Eisenberg, best-actor contenders are Javier Bardem as a dying father in the Spanish-language drama “Biutiful,” which also is up for best foreign-language film; Bridges as boozy lawman Rooster Cogburn in “True Grit,” a role that earned John Wayne an Oscar for the 1969 adaptation of the Western novel; and James Franco in the real-life tale of a climber trapped in a crevasse after a boulder crushes his arm in “127 Hours.”

Bening was nominated for best actress as a lesbian mom whose family is thrown into turmoil after her teenage children seek out their sperm-donor father in “The Kids Are All Right.” Portman was nominated as a ballerina losing her grip on reality in “Black Swan.”

Other best-actress nominees are Nicole Kidman as a grieving mother in “Rabbit Hole”; Jennifer Lawrence as a teen trying to find her missing father amid the Ozark Mountains‘ criminal underbelly in “Winter’s Bone”; and Michelle Williams as a wife in a failing marriage in “Blue Valentine.”

Joining Fincher among best-director picks are Darren Aronofsky for “Black Swan”; Joel and Ethan Coen for “True Grit”; Tom Hooper for “The King’s Speech”; and David O. Russell for “The Fighter.”

The directing category is back to an all-male lineup after Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win that prize last year for “The Hurt Locker,” which also claimed best picture.

The Oscar ceremony will be televised live on ABC from Hollywood’s Kodak Theatre.

THE LIST:

Best Motion Picture of the Year
Black Swan
The Fighter
Inception
The Kids are All Right
The King’s Speech
The Social Network
127 Hours
Toy Story 3
True Grit
Winter’s Bone

Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role
Annette Bening (The Kids are All Right)
Nicole Kidman (Rabbit Hole)
Jennifer Lawrence (Winter’s Bone)
Natalie Portman (Black Swan)
Michelle Williams (Blue Valentine)

Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role
Javier Bardem (Biutiful)
Jesse Eisenberg (The Social Network)
Colin Firth (The King’s Speech)
James Franco (127 Hours)
Jeff Bridges (True Grit)

Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role
Christian Bale (The Fighter)
John Hawkes (Winter’s Bone)
Jeremy Renner (The Town)
Mark Ruffalo (The Kids are All Right)
Geoffrey Rush (The King’s Speech)

Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role
Amy Adams (The Fighter)
Helena Bonham Carter (The King’s Speech)
Melissa Leo (The Fighter)
Hailee Steinfeld (True Grit)
Jacki Weaver (Animal Kingdom)

Best Animated Feature Film of the Year
How to Train Your Dragon
The Illusionist
Toy Story 3

Best Documentary Short Subject
Killing in the Name
Poster Girl
Strangers No More
Sun Come Up
The Warriors of Qiugang

Best Short Film (Animated)
Day & Night Teddy Newton
The Gruffalo Jakob Schuh and Max Lang
Let’s Pollute Geefwee Boedoe
The Lost Thing Shaun Tan and Andrew Ruhemann
Madagascar, carnet de voyage (Madagascar, a Journey Diary) Bastien Dubois

Best Short Film (Live Action)
The Confession Tanel Toom
The Crush Michael Creagh
God of Love Luke Matheny
Na Wewe Ivan Goldschmidt
Wish 143 Ian Barnes and Samantha Waite

Achievement in Art Direction
Alice in Wonderland
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1
Inception
The King’s Speech
True Grit

Achievement in Cinematography
Black Swan (Matthew Libatique)
Inception (Wally Pfister)
The King’s Speech (Danny Cohen)
The Social Network (Jeff Cronenweth)
True Grit (Roger Deakins)
Achievement in Costume Design
Alice in Wonderland (Colleen Atwood)
I Am Love (Antonella Cannarozzi)
The King’s Speech (Jenny Beaven)
The Tempest (Sandy Powell)
True Grit (Mary Zophres)

Achievement in Directing
Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan)
David O. Russell (The Fighter)
Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech)
David Fincher (The Social Network)
Joel and Ethan Coen (True Grit)

Best Documentary Feature
Exit through the Gift Shop Banksy, director (Paranoid Pictures)
Gasland Josh Fox, director (Gasland Productions, LLC)
Inside Job Charles Ferguson, director (Representational Pictures)
Restrepo Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger, directors (Outpost Films)
Waste Land Lucy Walker, director (Almega Projects)

Achievement in Makeup
Barney’s Version
The Way Back
The Wolfman

Achievement in Film Editing
Black Swan (Andrew Weisblum)
The Fighter (Pamela Martin)
The King’s Speech (Tariq Anwar)
127 Hours (Jon Harris)
The Social Network (Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall)

Best Foreign Language Film of the Year
Biutiful (Mexico)
Dogtooth (Greece)
In a Better World (Denmark)
Incendies (Canada)
Hors la Loi (Algeria)

Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures (Original Score)
How to Train Your Dragon (John Powell)
Inception (Hans Zimmer)
The King’s Speech (Alexandre Desplat)
127 Hours (A.R. Rahman)
The Social Network (Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross)

Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures (Original Song)
“Coming Home” from Country Strong Music and Lyric by Tom Douglas, Troy Verges and Hillary Lindsey
“I See the Light” from Tangled Music and Lyric by Alan Menken Lyric by Glenn Slater
“If I Rise” from 127 Hours Music by A.R. Rahman Lyric by Dido and Rollo Armstrong
“We Belong Together” from Toy Story 3 Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

Achievement in Sound Editing
Inception
Toy Story 3
TRON: Legacy
True Grit
Unstoppable

Achievement in Sound Mixing
Inception
The King’s Speech
Salt
The Social Network
True Grit

Achievement in Visual Effects
Alice in Wonderland
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1
Hereafter
Inception
Iron Man 2

Adapted Screenplay
127 Hours (Simon Beaufoy and Danny Boyle)
The Social Network (Aaron Sorkin)
Toy Story 3 (Michael Arndt, story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich)
True Grit (Joel Coen and Ethan Coen)
Winter’s Bone (Debra Granik and Anne Rossellini)

Original Screenplay
Another Year (Mike Leigh)
The Fighter (Paul Attanasio, Lewis Colich, Eric Johnson, Scott Silverand Paul Tamasy)
Inception (Christopher Nolan)
The Kids are All Right (Stuart Blumberg and Lisa Cholodenko)
The King’s Speech (David Seidler)

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/25/oscars-2011-nominees-list-academy-awards-nominations_n_813399.html

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